Tribal Membership is Open Now! Register Here!
Events 
CNM Recogniton   Cherokee Medicine  Trail Rides (Cabalgatas)   Pilgrimage to Sequoyah   Mexico Institute
Cherokee Seven point starCherokee
Church
Cherokee Seven point starCherokee
Medicine
Cherokee Seven point starCherokee Store
and Gallery

CABALGATA 2004

(See also Torreon Newspaper Coverage of thie event (translated from Spanish) (See also Cabagata)

Cherokees and the Cabalgata

  • Fourth Annual Tri State Cabalgata
  • Five northern Mexico Governors on hand
  • Cherokee Nation of Mexico lends color, tradition

Charming ladies, all - Sheron
(Photo - Left)
Charming ladies, all - Sheron "Butterfly" Rogers, Mary "Hummingbird" Layton, Esther "Hunter's Moon" Vann made great hosts for the open house at the Cherokee Ceremonial House for several thousand curious and eager visitors.

For the fourth consecutive year, the Cherokee Nation of Mexico was on hand for the three state cabalgata which formed itself in the tiny hamlet of Hidalgo, (in Colonial days, Pan) Coahuila. The annual affair, which has grown considerably in the past two years, has as its slogan, “United through tradition,” and the participants have swelled to an estimated nine thousand riders, provoking revised plans for the flow of equine traffic for next year. President of the Republic Vicente Fox, recuperating from an operation a year ago, on the advice of his physician was unable to make the trail ride but was on hand at the terminal point to underline it’s significance, and to assure the three Governors of Coahuila, Tamaulipas and Nuevo Leon that there would be significant changes for the well being of the northern Mexican states adjacent to Texas. Among those making the ride were Coahuila Governor Enrique Martinez y Martinez, Tamaulipas Governor Tomas Yarrington, and Nuevo Leon Governor Jose Natividad Gonzalez Paras, as well as Sonora Governor Eduardo Bours and Hidalgo Governor Manuel Angel Nunez.

Cherokee chief Charles Rogers confers with Piedras Negras Bishop Alfonso Garza prior to the start of the Cabalgata 2004. At left is his son Charles junior, to the right is Richard Vann with seven pipes in the form of tomahawks in his belt in preparation for the peace pipe ceremony.
(Photo - Right)
Cherokee chief Charles Rogers confers with Piedras Negras Bishop Alfonso Garza prior to the start of the Cabalgata 2004. At left is his son Charles junior, to the right is Richard Vann with seven pipes in the form of tomahawks in his belt in preparation for the peace pipe ceremony.

The President of the Republic indicated that the event not only manifested the unity of the region, but would involve serious actions which would benefit the quality of life for the inhabitants of the region and strengthen the hopes of gaining new horizons in every aspect.

In the shadow of the Cherokee Ceremonial House 2004, the Cherokee men perform the pipe ceremony. Left to right are the famous Gregg Kanoheski (Storyteller) Howard, Chief D. L.
(Photo - Left)
In the shadow of the Cherokee Ceremonial House 2004, the Cherokee men perform the pipe ceremony. Left to right are the famous Gregg Kanoheski (Storyteller) Howard, Chief D. L. "Pappy" Hicks, Rodney "Cherokee Heart" Garrett and David "Walks the Path Straight" Garrett.

At trail’s end, Santiago Creel, Secretary of the Government, Attorney General Rafael Macedo de la Concha and Energy Secretary Felipe Calderon. High level conferences were also the order of the day, as the officials gathered privately to tackle problems indigenous to the northeastern Mexican States and discuss solutions. On hand for the occasion was Piedras Negras Bishop Rt. Reverend Alfonso Garza, who would be called upon this past Sunday to celebrate mass at the main plaza in flood ravaged Villa de Fuente to show official Catholic church support for the Villa. The ceremonies at Hidalgo began with the Peace Pipe Ceremony performed by the Cherokee Nation of Mexico, the Governors of five Mexican states participating. Dr. Rogers then presented the Governors with a pipe for each, telling them “These pipes represent a vote by each Governor for a bright future for Mexico.” With that the four Governors raised the pipes to the cheering crowd of thousands.

A new wrinkle in the Cherokee fabric came in 2004 when Cherokee minister Durbin Feeling and White Chief, spiritual advisor and elder Cherokee brave Alan Herrin performed the healing services.
(Photo - Right)
A new wrinkle in the Cherokee fabric came in 2004 when Cherokee minister Durbin Feeling and White Chief, spiritual advisor and elder Cherokee brave Alan Herrin performed the healing services.

The Cherokee Nation of Mexico, headed by Chief Charles Rogers of Brownsville Matamoros, since August 2001 an effective force in the development of socio economic programs from Matamoros to Saltillo to Zaragoza, Coahuila, added much flair and color to the event. At Hidalgo the Cherokees rebuilt the Cherokee House which they, had erected the year before. “This one is much higher, stronger and durable,” Chief Rogers told the News Guide, ”some 43 feet high but this one has concrete foundations hidden among the cedar poles which make up the walls. The interior of the Cherokee House, however, still had the circle of stones around which many of the ceremonies took place, including a Cherokee wedding and an added attraction, a service of healing performed by minister Durbin Feeling and White Chief Alan Herrin, the spiritual advisor and elder Cherokee brave

War and Peace come together at Hidalgo as the Governors of four Mexican border states discuss the uses of the peace pipe. Governor Enrique Martinez (second from the left) has already discovered its dual use as a tomahawk. He got a real one in August of 2001 at the Recognition ceremony in Saltillo.
(Photo - Left)
War and Peace come together at Hidalgo as the Governors of four Mexican border states discuss the uses of the peace pipe. Governor Enrique Martinez (second from the left) has already discovered its dual use as a tomahawk. He got a real one in August of 2001 at the Recognition ceremony in Saltillo.

“We have always been deeply grateful to Mexico for their part in allowing the few Cherokee refugees from East Texas to come to the Republic since 1840,” Rogers underlined. “For their part, the Cherokees showed their gratitude by serving effectively with the Mexican army in their fight for freedom.” He was referring to the 40 Cherokees who served with the Rio Grande troops as members of General Adrian Woell’s Army who died at the Battle of the Salado east of San Antonio in September of 1842.

No way out - This pair of Cherokee braves found themselves surrounded by 9,998 Mexican vaqueros. But apparently White Bear and Joe Hawks were not worried. The Cherokees had many generations since had made friends with the Mexicans.
(Photo - Right)
No way out - This pair of Cherokee braves found themselves surrounded by 9,998 Mexican vaqueros. But apparently White Bear and Joe Hawks were not worried. The Cherokees had many generations since had made friends with the Mexicans.

One of Maverick County’s most famous Indian fighters on this frontier, Green Van, whose family escaped the wrath of Mirabeau Bonaparte Lamar in 1839 and came to Mexico, settling in Santa Rosa, now Muzquiz, Coahuila, also had descendants at the cabalgata, Rich and his wife from Del Rio, (and don’t forget Princess and Ray Vann and his wife of San Antonio. “The Vanns were %end prominent in the history of the Zaragoza Eagle ss area in the nineteenth century,” Dr. Rogers recalled, “and their descendants are still living in the area.” The Doctor and his Cherokee Nation of Mexico hope to tour the house that Green Vann built “before the Civil War” in northern Maverick County on the famous Chupadero Ranch.

Chief Rogers' mom Mary Wahela (Humming Bird) Layton and Frankie Ajila (Fire) Herrin enjoy retelling the story of the wagon wreck, and plot to go back out with the same horse immediately.
(Photo - Left)
Chief Rogers' mom Mary Wahela (Humming Bird) Layton and Frankie Ajila (Fire) Herrin enjoy retelling the story of the wagon wreck, and plot to go back out with the same horse immediately.

Various Maverick County and Eagle Pass officials were also on hand to lend solidarity to the event, so evocative of our Country’s almost forgotten past, including John Sullivan of the County Judge’s office and Chamber of Commerce President Chad Foster, a long time supporter of Maverick County agri business and his work with the youth of this community.

Well, they were with us, anyway - Elders retired Army Captain D.L.
(Photo - Right)
Well, they were with us, anyway - Elders retired Army Captain D.L. "Pappy" Hicks veteran of more than one war, Sue McCulloch, Mary Layton, Frankie Herrin, Esther Vann, Cris Feeling and Al Herrin are prepared to participate in Cabalgata 2004.

The cabalgata wound up on the Anahuac highway in Nuevo Laredo at the Department of Public Safety building where hundreds of aficionados gathered to congratulate and applaud the riders.

A peach of a pair - George Charles Prophecy Rogers and Holly Winter Red Berries Nowlin, 17, greet Mexican families and make new friends by passing out the beads they hold and ask the One Creator of All Things to Bless these new friends and their families.
(Photo - Left)
A peach of a pair - George Charles Prophecy Rogers and Holly Winter Red Berries Nowlin, 17, greet Mexican families and make new friends by passing out the beads they hold and ask the One Creator of All Things to Bless these new friends and their families.

The largest turnout of riders in the four year history of this Cabalgata, termed the “United in our traditions” trail ride, with an estimated over 9,000 horses and riders, “an amazing sight to behold,” one Cherokee mused. The Cherokee Nation of Mexico did their part to make the event better than the previous year, adding to the Cherokee Ceremonial House which was built on the fairgrounds at Hidalgo last year, this time bringing the cane roof of the structure to a 43 foot peak. They also brought and gave away an astonishing 14,000 beaded necklaces in red, white and green. The crowds, however, were most impressed by the Cherokee Princesses. Dressed in flowing white deer-skin the two beautiful young ladies Holly “Golah Geegahgay Adahduhski” Nowlin and Jasmin Joostlah Atritlaygee “Running Fox” Vann represented their tribe in an outstanding manner. For hours the two met people, posed for endless photographs and handed out the beaded necklaces Friday until the late hours of the evening, then rode out the following morning with the group.

The Vanns of Del Rio were well represented in Jasmin Vann (right) and her fellow Cherokee Princess Holly Nowlin. Let it be noted that the two are experienced horsewomen and are not simply posing astride their trusty steeds.
(Photo - Right)
The Vanns of Del Rio were well represented in Jasmin Vann (right) and her fellow Cherokee Princess Holly Nowlin. Let it be noted that the two are experienced horsewomen and are not simply posing astride their trusty steeds.

The Cherokee Nation of Mexico rode only a part of the way south across the rolling Coahuila terrain toward the Columbia Bridge, then returned to the Cherokee Ceremonial House for festivities. Here Chief of the Cherokee Nation of Mexico Dr. Charles Rogers performed a Cherokee wedding; the bride Barbara Sue Siegrist, and the groom David McCulloch were wrapped in a white blanket as their families gave their blessings and offered jerky and cornbread to the gathering. A bit of unscheduled excitement took place during the ride, when the horse pulling the wagon carrying the Tribal elders bolted and overturned the wagon. Chief Rogers and his warriors ran to the aid of the elders with mounting dismay, as 10,000 horses bore down on them. When Chief Rogers arrived, he found the wagon, with its erstwhile party of passengers scrambling up the embankment amidst peals of laughter, none the worse for wear. It seems the elders enjoy a good adventure. Chief Rogers asserted that “the horse was simply trying to leave the scene because the conversation of the Cherokee elders in the wagon was very irritating and disturbing to his equine ears, and was more than he could bear.”

A brand new Cherokee Ceremonial House rose out of the Coahuila plain at Hidalgo in 2004, center of attraction for many of the riders and participants in the Cabalgata 2004. The walls represent a woven basket, the thatched roof rising 43 feet into the Coahuila sky.
(Photo - Left)
A brand new Cherokee Ceremonial House rose out of the Coahuila plain at Hidalgo in 2004, center of attraction for many of the riders and participants in the Cabalgata 2004. The walls represent a woven basket, the thatched roof rising 43 feet into the Coahuila sky.

The Cherokees were especially impressed and touched by the demeanor of Mexican families as they entered the Ceremonial House Friday night. The crowd was reverent as they lined up to enter the house, the men removing their hats, and everyone anxious to participate in this Native American custom, awaiting their turn to have the ceremonial beads placed around their necks in yet another international friendship gesture.

And he knows how to use it too, just as the ancient Cherokees did - Rodney
(Photo - Right)
And he knows how to use it too, just as the ancient Cherokees did - Rodney "Heart of the Cherokee" Garrett takes his favorite bow, mounts up and rides with ten thousand Mexican friends at the Cabalgata 2004

The Cherokees wished each one good luck. with the blessings of the Creator, then demonstrated drums, shakers, flutes and showed blankets and the ever present buffalo hides, so dear to the Native Americans.

A portion of the much more permanent Cherokee Ceremonial House at the Hidalgo Fairgrounds can be seen here behind cousins David
(Photo - Left)
A portion of the much more permanent Cherokee Ceremonial House at the Hidalgo Fairgrounds can be seen here behind cousins David "Straight Path" Garrett and the Cherokee Nation of Mexico Chief Charles Rogers.

As usual, the Cherokees left Mexico with warm memories of the new friends they had made and left behind, and many who had been present at previous cabalgatas, including the Director of the Piedras Negras Centro de Salud Dr. Rogelio Valdes Mier.

All in the family, the  Cherokee  Princesses know how to handle a horse. Here Paula and Chuck Nowlin, parents of Princess Holly Winter Red Berries Nowlin give their lovely Princess some last minute instructions.
(Photo - Right)
All in the family, the Cherokee Princesses know how to handle a horse. Here Paula and Chuck Nowlin, parents of Princess Holly "Winter Red Berries" Nowlin give their lovely Princess some last minute instructions.

The eager Eagle Pass Maverick County contingent, too, was in full force at Hidalgo for the Fourth Annual Cabalgata. Astride his trusty paint was none other than Eagle Pass Mayor Joaquin R. Rodriguez, along with his side kick and former Mayor now his Honor Maverick County Judge Jose Pepe Aranda, and Commissioner Rudy Heredia. From the Judge’s office came John and Carol Sullivan, and Eagle Pass Mayor elect Chad Foster, along with Billy Berain, Marcelo Alvarez, Luis and Marisela Castillo and family, Santana Salinas. Alberto Cedilto and family, Juan Flores and family, Luis Miranda and family, Jaime Martinez and family, Pepe Tovar and family, Martin Garcia and family, Telico Hernandez and family and Ernesto Salazar.

A real dyed in the wool outdoors man. Clay
(Photo - Left)
A real dyed in the wool outdoors man. Clay "Spirit Walker" Garrett, Barbara Jean Tojoowah "Red Bird" and Diane "Corn Cake" Garrett have since 2001 made all the Cherokee Nation of Mexico gatherings, whether at Zaragosa or at Hidalgo, Coahuila.

“Eagle Pass has a long, interesting and rich Agri Business tradition,” Foster told the News Guide. “The history of agriculture and stock raising here began before the Civil War with the sheep raising industry, and continued with irrigation water pumped from the Rio Grande to various commercial farms (el Indio Ranch, the Dolch Farms and the Hopedale area) around the turn of the century, through the lean years before the big irrigation canal became a reality in the early 1930s.”

More in common than their Cherokee blood - David
(Photo - Right)
More in common than their Cherokee blood - David "Walks the Path Straight" Garrett and wife Janet "Laughing Waters". Texas Cherokees pose with their Okalahoma brothers Frankie "Fire" Herrin and White Chief Al "White Heron" Herrin. Both ladies are school teachers.

From his Maverick County roots, Foster knew the traditional stories about the Cherokee who built the San Miguel ranch house (1873) in northern Maverick County, and his own Chupadero Ranch house (1852 according to the Wipff family tradition) and, eager to learn more, spoke at length with Dr. Charles Rogers, Chief of the Cherokee Nation of Mexico along with Richard Vann, a direct descendant of the famous Maverick County rancher, carpenter and lawman, Manuel Green Vann. The gregarious and knowledgeable Chief Rogers was eager to share the story of how and why the Cherokees came to northern Mexico in 1840, still under investigation in the Saltillo archives.

By the nose - Sporting their festive Cherokee finery, the nose shows it all. Chuck Nowlin, Dr. Charles Rogers and Ray Vann were comparing Cherokee noses.
(Photo - Left)
By the nose - Sporting their festive Cherokee finery, the nose shows it all. Chuck Nowlin, Dr. Charles Rogers and Ray Vann were comparing Cherokee noses.


Getting ready for the ride at Hidalgo, much respected Dr. Durbin Feeling, PhD. world's most fluent Cherokee linguist, chooses to use sign language to say hello at the Hidalgo Fairgrounds.
(Photo - Right)
Getting ready for the ride at Hidalgo, much respected Dr. Durbin Feeling, PhD. world's most fluent Cherokee linguist, chooses to use sign language to say hello at the Hidalgo Fairgrounds.

In the Cherokee tradition, women have always enjoyed equal status. Here Barbara Hackett performed the peace pipe ceremony for the ladies of the tribe as Rodney Garrett and Lari Howard look on.
(Photo - Left)
In the Cherokee tradition, women have always enjoyed equal status. Here Barbara Hackett performed the peace pipe ceremony for the ladies of the tribe as Rodney Garrett and Lari Howard look on.


Hit it, Mom. Mary Wahela
(Photo - Right)
Hit it, Mom. Mary Wahela "Hummingbird" Layton can out drum the youngest members of the Cherokee tribe. She broke two drum sticks in the process to prove it.

A true Cherokee Princess is Del Rio's beautiful and sweet  Jasmin
(Photo - Left)
A true Cherokee Princess is Del Rio's beautiful and sweet Jasmin "Running Fox" Vann, who represented her tribe well. Jasmin is already making exceptional marks in her school work, earning credits towards college. The Vanns of Del Rio are direct descendants of our own Maverick County and Muzquiz, Coahuila pioneer Green Vann.


Center of attention at the Hidalgo fairgrounds was the newly-constructed Cherokee Ceremonial House. Here Chief of the Cherokee Nation of Mexico chats with Liz Layton in front of the house.
(Photo - Right)
Center of attention at the Hidalgo fairgrounds was the newly-constructed Cherokee Ceremonial House. Here Chief of the Cherokee Nation of Mexico chats with Liz Layton in front of the house.

Colorful Bill
(Photo - Left)
Colorful Bill "Featherman" Human of Washington State who loves the border life, especially at Zaragoza; and his delightful friend Kathy were favorites.


Coahuila Governor Enrique Martinez shakes hands with Chief Charles Rogers as Governor Yarrington and the Sinaloa Governor visit at the Cherokee Ceremonial House Friday night at the Hidalgo camp grounds.
(Photo - Right)
Coahuila Governor Enrique Martinez shakes hands with Chief Charles Rogers as Governor Yarrington and the Sinaloa Governor visit at the Cherokee Ceremonial House Friday night at the Hidalgo camp grounds.

Charles
(Photo - Left)
Charles "Prophecy" Rogers in traditional Cherokee dress and face paint: a young story teller who works hard for his tribe.


Clay
(Photo - Right)
Clay "White Bear" Garrett wearing a ceremonial head dress which will be exchanged for a turban when he becomes a brave.

Cherokee Charles F. Nowlin of Dallas cannot help but be proud of his beautiful daughter, Princess Holly
(Photo - Left)
Cherokee Charles F. Nowlin of Dallas cannot help but be proud of his beautiful daughter, Princess Holly "Red Winter Berries" Nowlin as she represents her tribe at Hidalgo, Coahuila Mexico.


Chief Charles
(Photo - Right)
Chief Charles "Jahtlohi" Kingfisher Rogers, Bill "Featherman" Human, Mary "Hummingbird" Layton, Charles "Prophecy" Rogers, Holly "Red Winter Berries" Nowlin, Ray "Wolf Warrior" Vann as they prepared to greet Coahuila Governor Enrique Martinez y Martinez and his entourage at Hidalgo, Coahuila Mexico.

Joe
(Photo - Left)
Joe "Hawks" Layton's family - Mary Allison, Katie and Morgan show the smiles they will display next year when two of these young ladies will become Cherokee Princesses.


Cherokee Wedding Ceremony at Hidalgo, Coahuila - Chief Charles Rogers, mother of the bride, Barbara Hackett, mother of the groom, Joe McCulloch tie the traditional white blanket around the couple. Barbara Sue Siegrist, and David McCulloch.
(Photo - Right)
Cherokee Wedding Ceremony at Hidalgo, Coahuila - Chief Charles Rogers, mother of the bride, Barbara Hackett, mother of the groom, Joe McCulloch tie the traditional white blanket around the couple. Barbara Sue Siegrist, and David McCulloch.

Clay White Bear Garrett at entrance to Cabalgata grounds.
(Photo - Left)
Clay White Bear Garrett at entrance to Cabalgata grounds.


Chief Rogers leads the Governors in a
(Photo - Right)
Chief Rogers leads the Governors in a "vote for a prosperous future for Mexico"

David Walks the Path Straight Garrett drums an introduction for a speech from Sr Reyas, representative.
(Photo - Left)
David Walks the Path Straight Garrett drums an introduction for a speech from Sr Reyas, representative.


Governors are on their way to the Cherokee Ceremonial House to great the Cherokees.
(Photo - Right)
Governors are on their way to the Cherokee Ceremonial House to great the Cherokees.

Big brother adorns his baby sister with beads from the Cherokees.
(Photo - Left)
Big brother adorns his baby sister with beads from the Cherokees.


Mexican ranchers invite Bill Featherman Human to take a spin on their tractor.
(Photo - Right)
Mexican ranchers invite Bill Featherman Human to take a spin on their tractor.

Cherokee Princesses Holly Red Winter Berries Nowlin and Jasmin Running Fox Vann mount up for their first Cabalgata under instructions from Charles Prophecy Rogers, who is attending his third trail ride here.
(Photo - Left)
Cherokee Princesses Holly Red Winter Berries Nowlin and Jasmin Running Fox Vann mount up for their first Cabalgata under instructions from Charles Prophecy Rogers, who is attending his third trail ride here.


Tail end of the trail ride which stretched as far as the eye could see.
(Photo - Right)
Tail end of the trail ride which stretched as far as the eye could see.

Cherokee Wedding being performed in Ceremonial House.
(Photo - Left)
Cherokee Wedding being performed in Ceremonial House.












copyright 2012 Cherokee Nation of Sequoyah
     Must have permission to use or reprint by Charles Jahtlohi Rogers MD.

Home | Chief Rogers | History | Library | Religion | Storytelling | Music/Art | Events | Prophecy