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TRI-STATE TRAIL RIDE (CABALGATA)
EVERY YEAR ON FEB.28

(See also Cabalgata 2004
Chief Rogers performs the peace pipe ceremony with the noble governor of Coahuila, Sr. Enrique Martinez y Martinez

“Chief Rogers performs the peace pipe ceremony with the noble governor of Coahuila, Sr. Enrique Martinez y Martinez.”

The Cherokee Nation of Mexico squired by it’s Traditional Chief, Dr. Charles L. Rogers, together with a contingent of his tribe was on hand for the Third Annual Cabalgata “United in its Traditions” from Hidalgo, Coahuila. The year 2003 witnessed the construction of the traditional Cherokee house as the central point of the Hidalgo Exposition Grounds from which the 8,000 riders got underway bright and early Saturday morning in a steady drizzle. The Eagle Pass News Guide ran across at least three Eagle Passans on hand for the trail ride, Chad Foster, John Sullivan and his wife Carol were at the Exhibition Grounds and informed us that both Mayor Joaquin Rodriguez and County Judge Pepe Aranda were astride their mounts as well.

Just a quarter of the Mexican riders. A site not seen in 2000 years, since Genghis Khan.


(Photo - Left)
Just a quarter of the Mexican riders. A site not seen in 2000 years, since Genghis Khan.

On Friday, with Epigmenio Rodriguez assisting, the finishing touches on the Cherokee traditional house were completed by Dr. Rogers and his construction crew. The structure fascinated those gathered for the trail ride to its conclusion in Tamaulipas and the Cherokees were busy most of the day answering questions regarding what this strange seven sided structure represented. A number of Cherokee ceremonial items were also displayed around the dug out camp fire in the center of the structure. Young Charles Rogers, the son of Dr. Rogers, assisted in the placing of the large stones set around the opening in the earth. Among them authentic Cherokee bows and arrows, ceremonial rattles made of turtle shells covered with deerskin hide the foot of a deer serving as a handle. There was a drum made of a large turtle shell also covered with deer hide as well among others.

Big Cherokee Brave - Even braver Pony (Regan Water Hawk) “Ama Tawodi” Garrett.



(Photo - Right)
Big Cherokee Brave - Even braver Pony (Regan Water Hawk) “Ama Tawodi” Garrett.

The Cherokee house was 30 feet long, 20 wide and some 27 feet tall, built by Cherokee Nation of Mexico Chief Charles L. Rogers and Chief Grey Owl of Missouri with their crew. With neither nail nor screw nor other iron binding, but the cedar poles lashed together with rope. The walls were cedar poles set in the ground, lashed together with cane basket style and covered with mud then a white concrete covering applied. The roof was made of cane branches. “We had very few tools with which to work,” Grey Owl told the Eagle Pass News Guide, “a machete without a handle and a post hole digger that kept falling apart.” Chief Rogers sported a telltale sunburn to show for his hours in the blazing Hidalgo, Coahuila sun in the seven day undertaking. The structure is constructed in a familiar design of untold thousands of years of antiquity, the seven sides “just like that of Solomon’s Temple of Jewish antiquity.” Cedar poles were used to ward off any would-be insect attackers. Religion among the Cherokees represents a rampant Monotheism, supporting the one Creator of all things, and even includes the famous great flood story which destroyed all living things just as the story of Noah in the Jewish - Christian Bible.



Cherokee Nation of Mexico was pleased to return a battle flag of the Mexican Revolution to the Governor to be placed in the Coahuila Museum.

(Photo - Left)
Cherokee Nation of Mexico was pleased to return a battle flag of the Mexican Revolution to the Governor to be placed in the Coahuila Museum.

The Cherokee Nation of Mexico was understandably appreciative to Coahuila Governor Enrique Martinez y Martinez who gave the first recognition of the Cherokees in August of 2001, the first such recognition in 164 years.


Chiefs with Different Hats
(Photo - Right)
Chiefs with Different Hats.

Friday evening the Governors of three northern Mexican states gathered at the Cherokee Chief House for the traditional smoking of the peace pipe in the trail ride dedicated to world peace. The Bishop of Saltillo was also on hand for the opening prayer at the Hidalgo fairgrounds prior to the Cherokee ceremonies.

Chief Rogers performs the peace pipe ceremony that begins the 8,000 horse & rider Tri-State Cabalgata.


(Photo - Left)
Chief Rogers performs the peace pipe ceremony that begins the 8,000 horse & rider Tri-State Cabalgata.

But the Saturday start of the increasingly famous Cabalgata got underway earlier than planned and the Cherokees met the riders from all over northern Mexico including Ciudad Victoria, Parras, Sabinas, Nueva Rosita Morelos, Zaragoza and the state of Chihuahua some from as far away as Nayarit, Sonora in a constant drizzle.

Left to right, Straight Path, Little Cardinal and Fire - or Capitalist, Renowned Attorney and Emminent Educator - have a meeting on how best to advise the Chief. Typically Cherokee. (Photo - Right)
Left to right, Straight Path, Little Cardinal and Fire - or Capitalist, Renowned Attorney and Emminent Educator - have a meeting on how best to advise the Chief. Typically Cherokee.

But the Chief of the Cherokee Nation of Mexico was undaunted in his praise of his fellow Cherokee delegation which had spent the night at the Cherokee House at the fairgrounds who represented the Cherokee Nation of Mexico in the early ceremonies Saturday morning prior to the start of the Cabalgata, which terminated in Tamaulipas and included a visit by the President of all Mexico, Vicente Fox, whose remarks spotlighted the peaceful nature of this Third Annual Cabalgata.



Little White Bear & our Hero Gov. Martinez (Photo - Left)
Little White Bear & our Hero Gov. Martinez

Joe Hawks, Prophecy, Wolf Warrior & Kingfisher answer press questions while everyone else gets to ride.
(Photo - Right)
Joe Hawks, Prophecy, Wolf Warrior & Kingfisher answer press questions while everyone else gets to ride.



Bill “Feather Man” Human even dances with his horse.

(Photo - Left)
Bill “Feather Man” Human even dances with his horse.

To-ju-wah (Ann Smith), powerful lawyer; her IQ has the ability to catch this wagon on fire. (Photo - Right)
To-ju-wah (Ann Smith), powerful lawyer; her IQ has the ability to catch this wagon on fire.




The press corps keeps us Cherokees from riding.

(Photo - Left)
The press corps keeps us Cherokees from riding.

Charles Ahdolayhoeski drives the women (Mother Wolf, Walela, and Cactus Flower) to the Cabalgata. (Photo - Right)
Charles Ahdolayhoeski drives the women (Mother Wolf, Walela, and Cactus Flower) to the Cabalgata.

Joe Hawks Dancing Layton, wife Mary Gentle Breezes, daughters Allison Bright Star, Katie Dancing Waters and Morgan Daisy Face with their cousins Cody Bentle Bear and Kyle Hunter Bear Garrett. (Photo - Left)
Joe Hawks Dancing Layton, wife Mary Gentle Breezes, daughters Allison Bright Star, Katie Dancing Waters and Morgan Daisy Face with their cousins Cody Bentle Bear and Kyle Hunter Bear Garrett.


Being the smallest Cherokee present is not a limiting factor for Colin Fearless Bear Garrett.




(Photo - Right)
Being the smallest Cherokee present is not a limiting factor for Colin Fearless Bear Garrett.


Barbara Jean Tojuwah Garrett (Red Bird) - one of the Beloved Women of our tribe.


(Photo - Left)
Barbara Jean Tojuwah Garrett (Red Bird) - one of the Beloved Women of our tribe.









Rattles, drums, flutes, beads, hides, baskets, bows, arrows, pipes, tomahawks and such are all laid out to be touched & examined by visitors. (Photo - Right)
Rattles, drums, flutes, beads, hides, baskets, bows, arrows, pipes, tomahawks and such are all laid out to be touched & examined by visitors.


Charles Prophecy Rogers and Mother Wolf enjoy explaining Cherokee ways to the Mexicans and their children.

(Photo - Left)
Charles Prophecy Rogers and Mother Wolf enjoy explaining Cherokee ways to the Mexicans and their children.

Mary Walela (Hummingbird) Layton is one of the Beloved Women of our tribe.
(Photo - Right)
Mary Walela (Hummingbird) Layton is one of the Beloved Women of our tribe.


Mother Wolf presents the Peace Pole to the state of Coahuila.

(Photo - Left)
Mother Wolf presents the Peace Pole to the state of Coahuila.




Bill Featherman Human, Charles Prophecy Rogers & Chief Rogers face the press. Interviews are shared by the whole tribe and reporters always have hundreds of questions.

(Photo - Right)
Bill Featherman Human, Charles Prophecy Rogers & Chief Rogers face the press. Interviews are shared by the whole tribe and reporters always have hundreds of questions.

Chief “Jahtlohi” Rogers begins framework on the Cherokee Ceremonial House. Without the hard work of Cherokee brothers Joe Eagle Gentry and Epigmenio Rodriguez, this ceremonial house would not have been built in seven days. Joe Eagle is not afraid of any work; work is afraid of him.<br>Wado, Joe Eagle and Epigmenio.

(Photo - Left)
Chief “Jahtlohi” Rogers begins framework on the Cherokee Ceremonial House. Without the hard work of Cherokee brothers Joe Eagle Gentry and Epigmenio Rodriguez, this ceremonial house would not have been built in seven days. Joe Eagle is not afraid of any work; work is afraid of him.
Wado, Joe Eagle and Epigmenio.



Cherokee Ceremonial House being built in Hidalgo, Coahuila, Mexico. (Photo - Right)
Cherokee Ceremonial House being built in Hidalgo, Coahuila, Mexico.


Chief Charles “Jahtlohi” Rogers and Epigmenio Rodriquez hard at work.
(Photo - Left)
Chief Charles “Jahtlohi” Rogers and Epigmenio Rodriquez hard at work.

Now for the hard part - bringing in the roof beams using ropes. (Photo - Right)
Now for the hard part - bringing in the roof beams using ropes.


Next step - weaving branches of a willow-like shrub (which grows in abundance here) around cedar posts to form the walls. (Photo - Left)
Next step - weaving branches of a willow-like shrub (which grows in abundance here) around cedar posts to form the walls.

After Chief Rogers located the proper earth to build walls, the first load was ready to be mixed by the Chief and Epigmenio. (Photo - Right)
After Chief Rogers located the proper earth to build walls, the first load was ready to be mixed by the Chief and Epigmenio.


Epigmenio Rodriquez shows the others how it is done.






(Photo - Left)
Epigmenio Rodriquez shows the others how it is done.







Roof alone was over 3 times a mans height, so caution must be taken. But Joe Eagle Gentry is fearless.

(Photo - Left & Right)
Roof alone was over 3 times a mans height, so caution must be taken. But Joe Eagle Gentry is fearless.






Charles “Prophecy” Rogers & Clay “White Bear” Garrett place stones around sacred fire.

(Photo - Left)
Charles “Prophecy” Rogers & Clay “White Bear” Garrett place stones around sacred fire.

Cherokees gather in front of the house they built to please the governor and the Mexican people.

(Photo - Right)
Cherokees gather in front of the house they built to please the governor and the Mexican people.


The Cherokee House can comfortably accommodate 100 people.(Photo - Left)
The Cherokee House can comfortably accommodate 100 people.



A traditional Cherokee House without a buffalo hide floor just wouldn’t be right. (Photo - Right)
A traditional Cherokee House without a buffalo hide floor just wouldn’t be right.



A cold Hidalgo morning calls for an Indian blanket.


(Photo - Left)
A cold Hidalgo morning calls for an Indian blanket.

Joe Eagle Gentry helped build a beautiful house, and his wife Jody makes it even more beautiful with her presence.

(Photo - Right)
Joe Eagle Gentry helped build a beautiful house, and his wife Judy makes it even more beautiful with her presence.


Chief Charles Jahtlohi Rogers explains the significance of the ceremonial house to a reporter.

(Photo - Left)
Chief Charles Jahtlohi Rogers explains the significance of the ceremonial house to a reporter.

Seven flags - one for each clan.

(Photo - Right)
Seven flags - one for each clan.


Amy and James on a Hidalgo morning.

(Photo - Left)
Amy and James on a Hidalgo morning.

This conversation is probably not about tribal business. Chief Rogers and Ray “Wahiya” (Wolf) Vann. (Photo - Right)
This conversation is probably not about tribal business. Chief Rogers and Ray “Wahiya” (Wolf) Vann.


Glen and Barbara Hackett relax after the hard work of setting up the ceremonial house. (Photo - Left)
Glen and Barbara Hackett relax after the hard work of setting up the ceremonial house.

Glen & Barbara Hackett with Clay “White Bear” Garrett show visitors into the Cherokee House. (Photo - Right)
Glen & Barbara Hackett with Clay “White Bear” Garrett show visitors into the Cherokee House.




White Bear takes great pride in his Cherokee roots.





(Photo - Left)
White Bear takes great pride in his Cherokee roots.






Good Cherokee braves by any standard in time. Rodney “Cherokee Heart” Garrett, Ray “Wolf Warrior” Vann, Regan “Water Hawk” Garrett and Clay “Spiritwalker” Garrett.

(Photo - Right)
Good Cherokee braves by any standard in time. Rodney “Cherokee Heart” Garrett, Ray “Wolf Warrior” Vann, Regan “Water Hawk” Garrett and Clay “Spiritwalker” Garrett.

The chief uses his son’s younger eyes to affix the flag to the flagpole.

(Photo - Left)
The chief uses his son’s younger eyes to affix the flag to the flagpole.

Everyone was eager to learn all about Cherokee ways. (Photo - Right)
Everyone was eager to learn all about Cherokee ways.





White Bear and his father Spiritwalker can usually be found in the saddle. (Photo - Left)
White Bear and his father Spiritwalker can usually be found in the saddle.

Cherokee women welcome visitors to the ceremonial house with smiles and bead necklaces in red, green & white - the colors of the Mexican flag. (Photo - Right)
Cherokee women welcome visitors to the ceremonial house with smiles and bead necklaces in red, green & white - the colors of the Mexican flag.


The front was left open at 4.5 feet so that the press and the public could see the activities inside.






(Photo - Left)
The front was left open at 4.5 feet so that the press and the public could see the activities inside.


Chief “Jahtlohi” Rogers and Regan “Ame Tawodi” Garrett give you an idea of how tall the doorway is.






(Photo - Right)
Chief “Jahtlohi” Rogers and Regan “Ame Tawodi” Garrett give you an idea of how tall the doorway is.











Chief Rogers goes over everyone’s role in tribal ceremonies.

(Photo - Left)
Chief Rogers goes over everyone’s role in tribal ceremonies.



Governor Martinez applauds as the peace pipe is lit.



In the peace pipe ceremony, Governor Martinez takes a bold approach.(Photo - Right)
Governor Martinez applauds as the peace pipe is lit.

(Photo - Left)
In the peace pipe ceremony, Governor Martinez takes a bold approach.


Governor Tomas Yarrington Ruvalcaba doesn’t give the peace pipe a chance to grow cold, as Gov. Martinez encourages him.

(Photo - Right)
Governor Tomas Yarrington Ruvalcaba doesn’t give the peace pipe a chance to grow cold, as Gov. Martinez encourages him.

Governor Elizondo Barragán exhibits the Big City Monterrey technique, much to the delight of the others.
(Photo - Left)
Governor Elizondo Barragán exhibits the Big City Monterrey technique, much to the delight of the others.


Mexico’s Secretary of Energy, Sr. Martens Rebolledo is very energetic himself in smoking the peace pipe. (Photo - Right)
Mexico’s Secretary of Energy, Sr. Martens Rebolledo is very energetic himself in smoking the peace pipe.

Chief Joe Eagle Gentry steadies the young brave’s quiver as he draws a typically long Cherokee cane arrow to present in the spirit of peace and assistance to Coahuila to Gov. Enrique Martinez y Martinez. (Photo - Left)
Chief Joe Eagle Gentry steadies the young brave’s quiver as he draws a typically long Cherokee cane arrow to present in the spirit of peace and assistance to Coahuila to Gov. Enrique Martinez y Martinez.


Young Prophecy Rogers explains in Spanish to the three governors and cabinet Secretary the meaning of this arrow presentation.
(Photo - Right)
Young Prophecy Rogers explains in Spanish to the three governors and cabinet Secretary the meaning of this arrow presentation.

Gov. Martinez has some kind words of gratitude after Charles’s presentation.

(Photo - Left)
Gov. Martinez has some kind words of gratitude after Charles’s presentation.

White Bear and his sense of style impresses the governor. (Photo - Right)
White Bear and his sense of style impresses the governor.



Chief Rogers introduces Amy Brownlow’s presentation, sung a cappella for the governors. (Photo - Left)
Chief Rogers introduces Amy Brownlow’s presentation, sung a cappella for the governors.

Amy’s Native American ancestors would be proud of the way she contributes to the fellowship of any gathering. (Photo - Right)
Amy’s Native American ancestors would be proud of the way she contributes to the fellowship of any gathering.



Amy Brownlow sings the Cherokee Nation Prayer for Peace in Spanish and Cherokee for 3 governors & the Secretary of Energy.




(Photo - Left)
Amy Brownlow sings the Cherokee Nation Prayer for Peace in Spanish and Cherokee for 3 governors & the Secretary of Energy.





The governors were spellbound by Amy Brownlow’s “Prayer for Peace” in Cherokee and Spanish.(Photo - Right)
The governors were spellbound by Amy Brownlow’s “Prayer for Peace” in Cherokee and Spanish.

Charles Prophecy Rogers and Clay White Bear Rogers listen intently to the Chief.

(Photo - Left)
Charles Prophecy Rogers and Clay White Bear Rogers listen intently to the Chief.






A prominent Mexican surgeon in his authentic Charro costume oversees a television interview of another Mexican doctor - Chief Rogers. The chief’s answers are monitored by his son “Ahdoelayhoeski” and cousins Clay “White Bear” and Clay “Spirit Walker” Garrett. (Photo - Right)
A prominent Mexican surgeon in his authentic Charro costume oversees a television interview of another Mexican doctor - Chief Rogers. The chief’s answers are monitored by his son “Ahdoelayhoeski” and cousins Clay “White Bear” and Clay “Spirit Walker” Garrett.


Charles Prophecy Rogers & his father the chief have great respect for Ray “Wolf Warrior” Vann and his wonderful wife, Esther. (Photo - Left)
Charles Prophecy Rogers & his father the chief have great respect for Ray “Wolf Warrior” Vann and his wonderful wife, Esther.

Mexican Cherokees (Photo - Right)
Mexican Cherokees





With over 7 feet clearance, the official tribal banner, a gift from the state of Coahuila, graces the entrance.


(Photo - Left)
With over 7 feet clearance, the official tribal banner, a gift from the state of Coahuila, graces the entrance.







copyright © 2012 Cherokee Nation of Sequoyah
     Must have permission to use or reprint by Chales Jahtlohi Rogers MD.

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