Tribal Membership is Open Now! Register Here!
Storytelling
Storyteller Gregg Howard  Hear a Cherokee Legend Hear a Young Cherokee Storyteller  Cherokee Storytellers
Cherokee Seven point starCherokee
Church
Cherokee Seven point starCherokee
Medicine
Cherokee Seven point starCherokee Store
and Gallery

George Charles Sherson “Adoelayhoeski” Prophecy Rogers


George Charles Sherson “Adoelayhoeski“ Prophecy Rogers
A Young Cherokee Storyteller

To listen to
"Rabbit and Possum Seek Wives - A Cherokee Tale"
Told by Charles "Adolayhoeski" Rogers
click HERE
You may either save it to your computer or open it from here.


A Young Cherokee Storyteller

Osiyo. My name is Adolayheski George Charles Sherson Rogers; my Cherokee name, Adolayheski, means Prophecy. I am the son of Dr. Charles Jatlohi Rogers, the traditional chief of the Cherokee Nation of Mexico.

Because Cherokees do everything as a family, my family and I searched for nearly two years for the burial site of the famous Cherokee, Sequoyah. Along our trip, we had many spiritual encounters: At one point in our attempts to discover the great teacher’s resting place, we were considering whether an ancient cemetery where locals informed was the resting place for Native Americans who had been buried by the kind Christians who lived at that hacienda could be what we were looking for. Because of the numerous unmarked graves, my father instructed me to shoot an arrow out into the air. It’s landing point would possibly indicate the exact spot of the tomb because at this time we were at trail’s end. As my arrow flew up into the air it disappeared. We searched for nearly a half hour before realizing that the arrow had never hit the ground. It had hit, impossibly, a very thin tree branch, about thirty feet up. This meant, of course, that he was not buried there.

Charles
cj03a





(Photos - Left and Right)
(Charles “Ahdoelayhoeski” (Prophecy) Rogers (left) age 14. Unknown Qualla Boundary Cherokee brave circa 1910-1920 (on right) age 18, sharing genetic characteristics & expressions of attitude.

When we reached a cave on the land owned by the local rancher, Epigmenio Rodriguez, we had a very strong feeling that this had been what we were searching for. As my family, along with Al Kinsall, an Eagle Pass historian, crept into the cave, a very calm sensation fell over us, While my father was searching through it, I discovered a mark on the wall. Epigmenio had never seen this mark, and then stated, “The Prophecy had been fulfilled”. He proceeded in telling us the story of Sequoyah and how he prophesized that “A boy will come with the men, and will find the mark that would signify that this is my burial place. He will then bring my spirit back to my people.” This of course, is an overwhelming responsibility on my part, It is one I am willing to accept. I must teach Cherokee youth about our past and culture. I must help restore the ways of the Cherokee people.

Charles(Photo - Left)
Charles “Prophecy” Rogers locates the mark inside the tomb of Sequoyah.

My whole life I have lived among the Mexican people. I have either lived in Texas border towns or in the heart of Mexico itself. Being raised among the Mexican people and lifestyle, I have realized similarities in my family’s cultural heritage and theirs’. The Mexican and Cherokee people have been mixed or mestizo for hundreds of years, meaning that they have both European and indigenous roots. Most Mexicans are decedents of the native nhuatl speaking groups and Spanish conquistadores that invaded Central America, just as most Cherokee today are descendants of the original `Tsalagi’ people and early Welch settlers (and even before were a mixed people in ancient times). Therefore, I understand Sequoyah’s motive to travel to Mexico. He felt comfortable around the country’s inhabitants, finding many parallels in each other’s heritage and way of life which granted each man respect as a human.

Charles(Photo - Right)
Charles “Ahdoelayhoeski” (Prophecy) enters the cave in search of the tomb of Sequoyah. It is also the home to many rattlesnakes, none of which have been harmed and in turn, no Cherokees have been harmed by them.

The Cherokee and Mexican people are both very strong in culture, combining deep rooted traditions and modern day life. This is why I believe the Cherokee Nation of Mexico has been founded, to not only celebrate Sequoyah and his achievements, but to honor humanity and brotherhood. Because, just like the world’s water, we are all connected. Wah do

Charles (then age 14) with his then 87 - year old grandmother Mary Layton, who could not, even with a stiff leg, be kept out of the cave.(Photo - Left)
Charles (then age 14) with his then 87 - year old grandmother Mary Layton, who could not, even with a stiff leg, be kept out of the cave.



This introduction is dedicated to my father, whose path has been so noble. He is always generous with his time and money and always thinks of others. Not only does he try to make a better future for me, but for others as well. He works exceptionally hard and always tries to further his knowledge in his profession. He has set a good example of what a good father and citizen should be. I will always strive to follow in his footsteps.

Charles “Ahdoelayhoeski” and cousin Clay “Yona Unega Usti” (White Bear) Garrett place stones properly around the sacred fire within the Cherokee Ceremonial House in Hidalgo, Coahuila.(Photo - Right)
Charles “Ahdoelayhoeski” and cousin Clay “Yona Unega Usti” (White Bear) Garrett place stones properly around the sacred fire within the Cherokee Ceremonial House in Hidalgo, Coahuila.



Because the fire is an important part of all ceremonies, White Bear & Prophecy take great care in it’s construction.


(Photo - Left)
Because the fire is an important part of all ceremonies, White Bear & Prophecy take great care in it’s construction.

Elders help the young.(Photo - Right)
Elders help the young.


Making a presentation to Gov. Martinez, a man who, Charles

(Photo - Left)
Making a presentation to Gov. Martinez, a man who, Charles “Ahdoelayhoeski” has learned from experience, takes what young people have to say seriously.


Mexicans tell legends that the Cherokees had dominion over the horse.

(Photo - Right)
Mexicans tell legends that the Cherokees had dominion over the horse.

Charles shoots an arrow into the air, seeking a sign to the location of Sequoyah’s resting place.

(Photo - Left)
Charles shoots an arrow into the air, seeking a sign to the location of Sequoyah’s resting place.



(Photo - Right)
Find the arrow that was not allowed to come to the ground. When Charles “Ahdoelayhoeski” shot this cane, flint-tipped arrow over an ancient graveyard in search of a sign to indicate whether Sequoyah was there or not, as he and his family checked out many false leads.


Telling the story of all Cherokees and making friends with the Mexican press is one of Charles’s duties.

(Photo - Left)
Telling the story of all Cherokees and making friends with the Mexican press is one of Charles’s duties.

In fact, some parts of the job are just plain fun! (Photo - Right)
In fact, some parts of the job are just plain fun!


Charles Prophecy’s Grandmother can not be kept from a Cherokee wedding. Here with Charles’ cousin, chiropractor Amy “Doctor Bird” Rogers.

(Photo - Left)
Charles Prophecy’s Grandmother can not be kept from a Cherokee wedding. Here with Charles’ cousin, chiropractor Amy “Doctor Bird” Rogers.

Cherokees enjoy getting together and making friends of all ages. This is one of Ahdoelayhoeski’s special friends - Kreglyn “Mother Wolf”
(Photo - Right)
Cherokees enjoy getting together and making friends of all ages. This is one of Ahdoelayhoeski’s special friends - Kreglyn “Mother Wolf”

Charles and cousin Holly at the Walela concert.

(Photo - Left)
Charles and cousin Holly at the Walela concert.


Some of the work isn’t that tough.

A film maker doing a national documentary interviews Charles’ family as he translates.
(Photo - Right)
Some of the work isn’t that tough.

(Photo - Left)
A film maker doing a national documentary interviews Charles’ family as he translates.


Charles (Photo - Right)
Charles “Ahdoelayhoeski” (Prophecy) Rogers and his grandfather talk with Cherokee cousins - (from left) Regan “Water Hawk” Garrett, Rodney “Cherokee Heart” Garrett, Clay “Little White Bear” Garrett, and Clay “Spirit Walker” Garrett (far right).

Charles finds it easy to get into character while telling the Cherokee stories, as was the case at the wedding ceremony of his cousins Kip and Irene.

(Photo - Left)
Charles finds it easy to get into character while telling the Cherokee stories, as was the case at the wedding ceremony of his cousins Kip and Irene.

Charles


(Photo - Right)
Charles “Prophecy” Rogers presents an arrow to the wife of Governor Martinez y Martinez. She is a beautiful lady with a beautiful heart.



Bill (Photo - Left)
Bill “Featherman” Human and Charles “Prophecy” are in the receiving line for Gov. Martinez.

Ray and Esther Vann are a wonderful part of our Cherokee family. (Photo - Right)
Ray and Esther Vann are a wonderful part of our Cherokee family.



Elders enjoy being transported by buggy.

(Photo - Left)
Elders enjoy being transported by buggy.

Governor Martinez and Charles (Photo - Right)
Governor Martinez and Charles “Prophecy” Rogers were deeply moved by the Cherokee diva Amy Brownlow as she sings the Prayer for Peace.



Charles

(Photo - Left)
Charles “Ahdoelayhoeski” (Prophecy) Rogers’ grandmother, age 88, is inspirational not only to his family, but to the whole tribe.

Thousands of questions - Charles (Photo - Right)
Thousands of questions - Charles “Prophecy” Rogers enjoys answering them all.


Before we could even set up camp, story telling commenced.

(Photo - Left)
Before we could even set up camp, story telling commenced.

It has been heard that you can tell a Cherokee by their eyes and their expressions. What do you think?


(Photo - Right)
It has been heard that you can tell a Cherokee by their eyes and their expressions. What do you think?


Questions from Mexican governors can keep a young Cherokee on his toes.
(Photo - Left)
Questions from Mexican governors can keep a young Cherokee on his toes.


After a long day, an orange soda and a campfire are very welcome. (Photo - Right)
After a long day, an orange soda and a campfire are very welcome.


Cowboys and Indians exchanging views.

(Photo - Left)
Cowboys and Indians exchanging views.


(See also Our People - Charles Prophecy)







copyright 2012 Cherokee Nation of Sequoyah
     Must have permission to use or reprint by Chales Jahtlohi Rogers MD.

Home | Chief Rogers | History | Library | Religion | Storytelling | Music/Art | Events | Prophecy